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dc.contributor.authorWilks, Nathanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:10Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:10Z
dc.date.created2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-12112007-164845en_US
dc.identifiercat-001356563en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4028
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Mar. 10, 2008).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract and notes on performance.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.M.)--Texas Christian University, 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Fine Arts; advisor, Blaise Ferrandino.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description"In the first piece, ?Epiphany?, I wanted to express in music an experience I had while mountain biking in Colorado. There was an extremely harrowing section of trail that presented a good chance of serious injury, but despite my apprehension I took it anyway. Time seemed to slow as I traversed this section, and fear became exhilaration, and I felt as if I learned something profound about myself in that instant. The piece begins with a placid sonic landscape of fleeting pitch and ambiguous rhythm. This A section is punctuated by waves of sound that are highlighted by the solo flute line. In measure 15 this sonority is reduced to two violins that begin a transition that builds tension and foreshadows the arrival of a recurring percussive theme in the B section at measure 27. This percussive theme incorporates the strings, which are used to paint the percussive gesture with a more pungent sonority. This initial percussive theme is cut off in measure 43 by long glissandi in the strings that return the listener to the sonic landscape of the beginning and hints at ideas to come. The mellow sounds from the A section are now slightly more active, with more involvement from the rest of the orchestra. The horns take the rising and falling line from the flutes, while the woodwind section provides more refined pitch and color to the overall sonority before it is once again narrowed to two solo instruments in measure 66. This time, the flutes begin a more confident transition to the B section in measure 81, and the arrival of the percussive theme is much more tenacious and committed. Like the second A section, the second B section involves the entire orchestra, cycling the timbral ?paint? of the percussion from the strings, to winds, to brass, while at the same time accumulating layers of familiar material that also cycles through the different timbres of the orchestra."en_US
dc.description"At the height the piece?s fury, in measure 103, the B section is halted by the mass pitch bands in the strings, colored by the woodwinds. The idea here is that an instant in time is stretched and the listener experiences an unusual state of cognizance in which the ?epiphany? is revealed. Just as sudden as it came, this section is consumed in measure 111 by the same thunderous percussion it emerged from, though the clusters in the strings fade slowly through this continuation of the B section that comes to a close in measure 128. Familiar themes are used in a retransition that mirrors the previous transitions. The familiar rising and falling gesture in the flute signals a return to section A in measure 142. The final `wave? of sound at measure 151-155 recalls the percussive theme and string clusters, but is obscured as if its an event viewed through the lens of memory."en_US
dc.description"While composing the second piece, Lunar Pastoral, I kept my favorite photograph on the desk of the piano ? the earth rising over the moon?s horizon, taken by one of the Apollo 11 astronauts. To me, this has always been a profound image, representing the vulnerability and potential of humanity. I wanted to write a piece that reflects the sense of unity that the image evokes by using the same musical material in fundamentally different ways. To do this, I apply twelve-tone techniques as a thematic element, either juxtaposed or superimposed on a basic tonal background. The alto flute introduces the row, which is preceded by a ?prefix? of the first hexachord of the row. In other words, full statements of the row in prime form are in this order: hexachord I, hexachord I, hexachord II. This hints at hexachordal structural divisions. The first statement of the row is punctuated by the quartal/quintal harmonies in measure 18. The following measures transform the row and develop auxiliary ideas that conclude with a more fully realized version of the quartal/quintal idea in measure 30. In measure 36 the transition to the B section begins. The transition begins with a full statement of the row but uses hexachords and finally trichords to ?compress? the row and dilute the melodic orientation of the A section."en_US
dc.description"The B sections arrives in measure 48 and is more ?chord? oriented even though the pitches are derived from the row. Contrast within the B section comes from using pitches from hexachord I or hexachord II of the row. In measure 67, a struggle between the two hexachords ensues and culminates in a forceful statement of all twelve pitches in measure 73. This moment of maximum dissonance is followed immediately by a deep chordal retransition, where the bass note leads the return of A using a retrograde statement of the row. The A section emerges in measure 84 with a prime statement of the row, though the ?klangfarbenmelodie? technique is used to synthesize purely linear movement of the row and the simultaneities of a chordal texture. At measure 94, the last statement of the quartal/quintal idea is presented with deep chords in the bass recalling the retransition. A similar ?klangfarbenmelodie? statement of R0 is used to lead back to the final statement of the prime form of the row in measure 110. This last statement is distorted from its original form but its identity is clear."en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsI. Epiphany -- II. Lunar pastoral.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: PDF viewer.en_US
dc.subject.lcshOrchestral music Scores.en_US
dc.titleTwo pieces for orchestra [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.typeNotatedMusicen_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Fine Arts
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitCollege of Fine Arts
local.subjectareaMusic


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