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dc.creatorTeodor, Alexandra H.
dc.creatorSherman, Benjamin D.
dc.creatorIson, Zeah Yvette
dc.creatorOoi, Eu-Jee
dc.creatorBergkamp, Jesse J.
dc.creatorBruce, Barry D.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-15T14:31:59Z
dc.date.available2021-01-15T14:31:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/catal10091016
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/43063
dc.description.abstractThe biological process of photosynthesis was critical in catalyzing the oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago, changing the course of development of life on Earth. Recently, the fields of applied and synthetic photosynthesis have utilized the light-driven protein–pigment supercomplexes central to photosynthesis for the photocatalytic production of fuel and other various valuable products. The reaction center Photosystem I is of particular interest in applied photosynthesis due to its high stability post-purification, non-geopolitical limitation, and its ability to generate the greatest reducing power found in nature. These remarkable properties have been harnessed for the photocatalytic production of a number of valuable products in the applied photosynthesis research field. These primarily include photocurrents and molecular hydrogen as fuels. The use of artificial reaction centers to generate substrates and reducing equivalents to drive non-photoactive enzymes for valuable product generation has been a long-standing area of interest in the synthetic photosynthesis research field. In this review, we cover advances in these areas and further speculate synthetic and applied photosynthesis as photocatalysts for the generation of valuable products.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilitySherman (CHEM)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceCatalysts
dc.source.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2073-4344/10/9/1016
dc.subjectphotosynthesis
dc.subjectphotoelectrochemical devices
dc.subjectbiohybrid
dc.subjectsynthetic biology
dc.subjectphotochemistry
dc.subjectphotoelectrochemistry
dc.subjecthydrogen evolution
dc.titleGreen Catalysts: Applied and Synthetic Photosynthesis
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder2020 Teodor
dc.rights.licenseCC BY 4.0
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry


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