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dc.contributor.advisorCross, David R.
dc.contributor.authorIto-Jager, Sachiyoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:16Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:16Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifieretd-04142011-125616en_US
dc.identifierumi-10201en_US
dc.identifiercat-001673124en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4318
dc.description.abstractAlthough touch is an important component of attachment theory, most of the existing studies have focused on its extrinsic forms (i.e., being touched by a caregiver, and touching a caregiver) and neglected its intrinsic form (i.e., self-touch). The primary objectives of the present study were to first (1) examine whether the association between self-touch and attention focus emerges by toddlerhood in the presence of a caregiver, then (2) investigate whether the likelihood of self-touch varies by attachment style in a situation requiring attention focus, and finally (3) examine whether the association between self-touch and attention focus varies by attachment style. Data from forty-nine mother-child dyads were employed for analyses. The attachment classification of the children was determined using the Strange Situation. The instance of attention focus and self-touch behavior during a challenging task were coded by second. First, self-touch as related to attention focus was found to emerge by toddlerhood. Second, securely attached children were found to be more likely than insecurely attached children to exhibit self-touch in a situation requiring attention focus. Third, an association between lateral self-touch and attention focus was found for children of all attachment classifications. This association was particularly strong for securely attached children, who also displayed higher levels of attention focus. The present study found that self-touch is associated with attention focus during toddlerhood, and that this association is strongest for the toddlers who were securely attached as infants.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttachment behavior in children.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttention in children.en_US
dc.subject.lcshToddlers Psychology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTouch Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.titleAttention focus and self-touch in toddlers: the moderating effect of attachment securityen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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