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dc.contributor.advisorLozada, Francisco, Jr.
dc.contributor.authorKD, Naw San Deeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifieretd-05052011-082923en_US
dc.identifierumi-10234en_US
dc.identifiercat-001676047en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4321
dc.description.abstractNarratives of nation invoke feelings of longing for community and displacement of identity in the people. Through their narratives, nationalist writers consciously forge a community to configure such displacement out of diverse and contending cultural elements, traditions, and people. In resonance with such narration of nation, the writer(s) of the Gospel of John imagined a community of the disciples that was an alternative to the dominant Roman Empire. The Gospel, as many nationalist discourses under colonialism, is an enabling discourse for the colonized community, and thus, is a decolonizing text. In search of a community, however, the Gospel coercively forged many contending discourses into one, bearing resemblance with a colonizing discourse of the Empire. In doing so, even though the Gospel is a displacement narrative of the colonized, it manifests marginalization and lack of awareness of Other within its own construction of identity. The Gospel of John, therefore, is a de/colonizing text. The Gospel forcefully destabilizes, excludes, and marginalizes the voices of Other in its narratives. These marginal voices are represented by the claims of Ioudaioi and Samaritans that simultaneously enable and contend the Gospel's essentialist articulation of communal identity and boundary. Interpreting a discourse of margins such as the Gospel of John alerts one to the critical notion and reality of the ambivalent marginality that contains both danger and promise. Reading the Gospel of John for decolonization, in that case reading the Bible, therefore, requires a constant critique that destabilizes rigid binary pattern of thought, time, or axis of power by continually asking a question -- who are the receiving ends of this newly forged discourse of power or interpretation.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, TX : [Texas Christian University],en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible Postcolonial criticism.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNationalism Biblical teaching.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNationalism Religious aspects.en_US
dc.titleBelonging and/or nation: Postcolonial-diasporic reading of the narrative in John 4:1-42en_US
dc.title.alternative(Be)longing and/or nation: a postcolonial-diasporic reading of the narrative in John 4:1-42en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeBrite Divinity School
local.departmentBrite Divinity School
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorBrite Divinity School


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