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dc.contributor.authorKreitler, Crystal Mataen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifieretd-05042011-105748en_US
dc.identifierumi-10202en_US
dc.identifiercat-001676044en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4326
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed May 5, 2011).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisors, Timothy M. Barth, Donald F. Dansereau.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionMany individuals have difficulty with problem-solving and coping, a phenomenon often exacerbated by excessive rumination over past trauma, and worry about the future. The present study examined the impact of a "fill-in-the-node" spatial display that guides participants through a systematic written examination of alternatives and action plans for managing difficult experiences in the future. The use of this cognitive tool will be combined with a session of problem-based writing (Pennebaker, 1996), a method commonly used to cope with past traumatic experiences. A group given the combination of one session of problem-based writing followed by a second session using the cognitive tool ACED IT was compared with a group receiving two sessions of past-oriented problem-based writing, a group given an initial session of past-oriented problem-based writing followed by a session of future-oriented problem-based writing, and with a group given no treatment. The results revealed that participants that completed two sessions of past-oriented problem-based writing reported less rumination and avoidant behavior than participants that completed future-oriented problem-based writing or control questionnaires. Additionally, participants in the past-oriented problem-based writing were also less likely to report a tendency to re-experience trauma than those who completed a future-oriented session or control questionnaires. Finally, participants that completed ACED IT reported a greater likelihood to revise their future coping strategies and include others in future coping than participants in all other groups.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshProblem solving.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAdjustment (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshStress (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshCreative writing Therapeutic use.en_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a cognitive tool for enhanced problem-solving and coping [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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