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dc.contributor.authorLlado, Leslieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:18Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:18Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05032011-133125en_US
dc.identifierumi-10217en_US
dc.identifiercat-001677153en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4332
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed May. 9, 2011).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Environmental Science; advisor, Michael Slattery.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractGroundwater seeps are important hydrological and ecological features of many landscapes. Research on hyperseasonal Muhly hillslope seeps, dominated by Seep Muhly grass (Muhlenbergia reverchonii), has been limited. Muhly seeps result from interbedded Cretaceous limestone and marl geology of the Fredericksburg and Washita Groups of the Grand Prairie Ecoregion and are found on middle to lower slopes, often with an associated barrens environment. Results indicate that geologically controlled Muhly seeps are hydrologically disconnected from the rest of the hillslope, with the wettest portions of the hillslope at the Muhly seeps. The mechanics of these systems present a departure from traditional VSA and saturated wedge hillslope theories. Due to the extent of comparable geology within the Grand Prairie, results from this study could apply across a sizeable area, representing a large-scale deviation from traditional hillslope hollow mechanisms.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleSoil moisture dynamics of Muhly seeps in a hillslope hollow during low flow and storm conditions [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Environmental Science
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitSchool of Geology, Energy and the Environment
local.subjectareaEnvironmental Sciences


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