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dc.contributor.authorBridge, Morgan Christineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:25Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:25Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05232012-092302en_US
dc.identifierumi-10321en_US
dc.identifiercat-001830474en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4377
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed June 11, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Communication; advisor, Paul Schrodt.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing Petronio's (2002) Communication Privacy Management theory, the current study sought to explore the relationship between family communication patterns, privacy orientations, and students' perceptions of instructor disclosures. The study examined the degree to which students' privacy orientations and family communication patterns (i.e., conversation and conformity orientations) are associated with their perceptions of the frequency, relevance, and appropriateness of instructor disclosures in the college classroom. The results indicate that two dimensions of family communication patterns (i.e., conversation and conformity orientations) are associated with students' privacy orientations. Specifically, individuals from conversation oriented families tend to be more open and less private, yet individuals from conformity oriented families are more likely to be closed and private. Further, the results offer some support for the associations among family communication patterns (i.e., conversation and conformity orientations) and the frequency, relevance, and appropriateness of instructor disclosures in the classroom. While little support was found for the associations among students' privacy orientations and perceptions of instructor disclosures (i.e., frequency, relevance, and appropriateness), students with a weak privacy orientation are more likely to perceive instructors' disclosures as more frequent. Although privacy orientations did not mediate the association between individuals' family communication patterns and perceptions of instructor disclosures in the college classroom, family communication patterns and privacy orientations accounted for a unique percentage of the variance in students' perceptions of instructor disclosure frequency. Collectively, the results from this study contribute to the research on instructor disclosures by accounting for family communication patterns and privacy orientations as influential factors in the instructional contexten_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleFamily communication patterns and privacy orientations as predictors of students' perceptions of instructor disclosures in the college classroom [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Communication
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitBob Schieffer College of Communication


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