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dc.contributor.authorCarp, Charlotte Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:28Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:28Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifieretd-04262012-104650en_US
dc.identifierumi-10288en_US
dc.identifiercat-001816129en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4382
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Apr. 27, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Anna I. Petursdottir.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe mechanisms underlying stimulus equivalence are of considerable debate in the literature, especially regarding verbal behavior. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate Horne and Lowe's (1996) intraverbal naming hypothesis by investigating the effects of equivalence class formation on the emergence of novel intraverbals in six typically developing kindergarteners ages 4-6. Participants were first taught vocal tacts for pictures of states, birds, and flowers. Following tact training, they were exposed to MTS training in which they were first taught an A-B (i.e., state-bird) relation and an A-C (i.e., state-flower) relation and then exposed to an equivalence test probing 12 B-A, C-A, B-C, and C-B emergent intraverbal relations. Immediately following equivalence testing, an intraverbal test was conducted that probed intraverbal relations between the pictures (e.g., "Florida goes with which bird?"). Horne and Lowe predict that under those circumstances, participants who pass the equivalence test should also show a tendency to emit the relevant intraverbals. All three participants who passed the equivalence test passed the intraverbal test; however, two of those participants required additional rounds of both tests. Other participants passed a symmetry only test after requiring additional B-C training; only one of those participants passed the intraverbal test. Results suggest that verbal behavior may be necessary or have a substantial facilitative effect for performance on transitive relations, but unnecessary for performance on symmetrical relations. Implications for Horne and Lowe's (1996) analysis of intraverbal naming are discusseden_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChildren Language.en_US
dc.subject.lcshVerbal behavior.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStimulus generalization.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLearning, Psychology of.en_US
dc.titleMediation by intraverbal naming in children's equivalence test performance [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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