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dc.contributor.authorDiGioia, Kristin Leighen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:53Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:53Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05222013-130435en_US
dc.identifierumi-10417en_US
dc.identifiercat-001999998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4458
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed July 25, 2013).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Art History; advisor, Frances Colpitt.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractKara Walker's life-size cut-paper silhouettes, applied directly to the gallery wall, depict narratives of antebellum plantation life. Her artwork reveals contemporary racism via the historic lens of the Old South and a postmodern methodology of deconstruction. Walker's first silhouette debuted at The Drawing Center in 1994. Walker's work was poorly received by several prominent members of the African American community, namely black females. By 1997 she was at the center of a heated discussion about black representation and self-presentation that motivated a series of published articles, distributed letters and pamphlets, several symposia, and boycotts. Walker's critics vehemently attacked both her artwork and her person, calling her "a weapon against the Black community." The early responses to Walker by the African American community by her most outspoken critics, Betye Saar and Howardena Pindell, as well as the written forum and symposium "Change the Joke and Slip the Yoke" are explored. This thesis analyzes Walker's subsequent response through her artwork, by focusing on: Do You Like Creme in Your Coffee and Chocolate in Your Milk? (1997) a series of over sixty drawings, watercolors, and writings, Cut (1999), and Hunting Scene (2001).en_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until May 22, 2015; Texas Christian University.en_US
dc.title"Should I never be heard from again?" [electronic resource] : the controversial reception of Kara Walker /en_US
dc.title.alternativeControversial reception of Kara Walkeren_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Art History
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitSchool of Art


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