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dc.contributor.advisorLord, Charles G.
dc.contributor.authorLu, Tongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:57Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:57Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifierUMI thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05212013-132228en_US
dc.identifierumi-10389en_US
dc.identifiercat-001996968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4481
dc.description.abstractModern theory and research on evaluative processes, combined with a comprehensive review of deliberate self-persuasion (Maio & Thomas, 2007), suggest two types of strategies people can use to construct new, more desired attitudes. Epistemic strategies change the perceived valence of associations activated by the attitude object. Teleologic strategies, in contrast, keep undesired associations from being activated in the first place, thus obviating the need to change their perceived valence. Change in perceived valence of associations, therefore, might predict attitude change better when people pursue epistemic than teleologic strategies for deliberate self-persuasion. This hypothesis gained convergent support from two studies in which use of epistemic versus teleologic strategies was measured as an individual difference (Study 1) and manipulated (Study 2). The results of these two studies supported the theoretical distinction between the two strategies and suggested further research directions.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleBehind the stage of deliberate self-persuasion: when changes in spontaneous associations to an attitude object lead to attitude changeen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreThesis
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science


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