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dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Warren
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Ronald Dennisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:49:03Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:49:03Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifieretd-05222013-122954en_US
dc.identifierumi-10383en_US
dc.identifiercat-002008957en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4492
dc.description.abstractMost previous treatments of the four mageia-miracle conflicts in Acts (8:4-25; 13:4-12; 16:16-18; 19:8-20) do not adequately account for the socially constructed nature of the Greco-Roman concept of mageia and also fail to make an adequate distinction between modern Western concepts of magic and the ancient Greco-Roman concept of mageia. Employing a social-scientific-critical method, this dissertation engages in a narrative-focused analysis of these four texts and other relevant texts from Acts to understand better the socio-cultural elements in Acts' presentation of both miracle-working characters and their rival wonder-working characters, whom Acts primarily presents as popular magoi. My social-scientific-critical approach primarily depends upon the historical theory of Kimberly Stratton, the theories of the social-scientific study of magic, and the social-scientific study of social deviance (particularly the symbolic interactionist approach to deviance). For Greco-Roman Gentile readers in the regions stretching form Achaia to Asia Minor during the late first to early second centuries, the competitions between miracle-workers and popular magoi in the four mageia-miracle conflicts in Acts would function as more than mere warnings against the syncretizing of the Christ-movement with mageia or the recounting of historical tales of popular magoi who competed against the early Christ-following missionaries; instead, these four episodes contribute significantly to Acts development of a social identity for the relatively undefined social role of Christ-following miracle-worker. This miracle-worker social identity would not only function as a means of countering accusations of popular mageia directed at the Christ-movement but might also serve as a means by which a Christ-following reader of Acts may distinguish between legitimate wonder-workers (that is, miracle-workers) and illegitimate wonder-workers (that is, popular magoi).
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, TX. : [Texas Christian University],en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until May 22, 2015: Texas Christian University.
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMagic Religious aspects Christianity.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMiracles.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeviant behavior.en_US
dc.titleConflicts of mageia and miracle in the Acts of the Apostles: Social discourse on legitimate and deviant use of spiritual poweren_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeBrite Divinity School
local.departmentBrite Divinity School
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorBrite Divinity School


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