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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Gene Allen
dc.contributor.authorStoltz, Joseph Frederick, IIIen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialNew Orleans (La.)en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:49:05Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:49:05Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifieretd-08082013-102314en_US
dc.identifierumi-10439en_US
dc.identifiercat-002009128en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4505
dc.description.abstractThe year 1816 witnessed Americans around the country celebrating the anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans with enthusiasm rarely paralleled in the early United States' young history. Over the next two centuries the idea of the battle became the tool of numerous politicians, social groups, and cultural movements each defining their version of the events legacy. Each successive generation of Americans have learned a new discriminate version of the narrative that met the socio-cultural needs of that time and place in the United States. Those individual iterations not only shaped the memory of the battle in the contemporary time of its development, but also influenced the iterations developed by later generations. Depictions of the battle as the triumph of the frontier farmer in the earlier national period set the stage for the rise of Andrew Jackson to the presidency. Jacksonian renditions of the battle alienated Whigs and forced them to cease commemorating the event. Almost two centuries of African-American exclusion from the battle's main narrative limited the ability of National Park Service personnel to reach out to that community even into the late twentieth century. Understanding these popular versions of the battle's narrative gives new insight into the generations of Americans that developed their version of their national history. Also, examining the consequences of the individual versions of history offers the chance to learn how historical commemoration effects the public's understanding of its history. This is especially timely as the two hundredth anniversary of the battle approaches and various agencies are already at work developing the latest version of this important time in American history.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until Aug. 8, 2015: Texas Christian University.
dc.subject.lcshNew Orleans, Battle of, New Orleans, La., 1815.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPublic history Political aspects United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHistory in popular culture United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMass media and history United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCollective memory United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJackson, Andrew, 1767-1845.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNew Orleans (La.) History 19th century.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States History 1815-1861.en_US
dc.titleA victory as never crowned the wars of the world: the Battle of New Orleans in American historical memoryen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of History
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeAddRan College of Liberal Arts
local.departmentHistory
local.academicunitDepartment of History
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaHistory
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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