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dc.contributor.authorAli, Iman
dc.date2021-05-19
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T21:48:49Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T21:48:49Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/49095
dc.description.abstractAntibiotic resistance has been increasing rapidly; however, the amount of new and effective antibiotics is declining. One area of growing interest is the use of metal oxide nanoparticles because they are relatively easy to make and can be synthesized into different shapes, sizes, and with various chemical properties. In particular, zinc oxide nanoparticles have shown to be effective against various bacterial strains; however, the mechanisms of zinc oxide antimicrobial activity is still unknown. It is also not clear what properties of zinc oxide, such as size or proximity to bacterial cells, are critical for its antimicrobial activity. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanism behind zinc oxide's antimicrobial activity, we tested Staphylococcus aureus with various zinc oxide particles under different conditions. Specifically, we looked at whether particle size, contact with bacterial cells, and media type influenced antimicrobial activity. Our results suggest that particle size does not influence zinc oxide activity, but media type significantly impacts antimicrobial activity. Physical contact, although more effective, is not absolutely required to see inhibition of bacterial growth. Understanding the mechanisms that zinc oxide utilizes may guide design for future particles that will improve their effectiveness.
dc.titleMechanisms of Zinc Oxide Antibacterial Activity in Staphylococcus aureus
etd.degree.departmentBiology
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.collegeJohn V. Roach Honors College
local.departmentBiology


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