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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Sharon Andersonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-12T18:45:38Z
dc.date.available2014-08-12T18:45:38Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierumi-10530en_US
dc.identifiercat-002174119en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/6045
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Aug. 28, 2014).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of English; advisor, Ann L. George.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description"Chapter 1, "Introduction: Wait 'til It's Bad" introduces my dissertation as a scenic, rather than narrative, rhetorical history answering Marlia Banning's call for a way to respond to public doubts about climate change science. I explain how Burke's dramatistic theory of human motives provides a framework for my construction of three scenes of debate about the environment. I explain how Burke's theory of terminological screens provides a sensitive heuristic for analysis of the vocabulary used by Bill McKibben's group 350.org to persuade digital and embodied publics of the need to reduce carbon emissions. In chapter two, "Choosing Terminology in the Global Warming Drama," I provide a close reading of selected documents in scenes of pro- and anti-environmentalism in the decades before the International Day of Climate Action, an embodied and digital event organized by 350.org to influence decisions at the 2009 United Nations Framework Conference on Climate Change.^I analyzed the potential of vocabulary to motivate and de-motivate environmental activism. In chapter three, "Bill McKibben and 350.org: Circumferences and Reductions in the Rhetoric of a Social Movement," I argued that contracting and expanding terminological circumferences first establish and then limit the scope of 350.org's influence. My examination of McKibben's rhetorical efforts reveals his ability to manipulate terminological circumferences, but also his failure to deflect widespread public attention from the arguments of climate change deniers. In chapter four, "Overcoming Trained Incapacity," I created a new way of seeing the connection between Burke's concepts of the rottenness of perfection, trained incapacity, and piety by demonstrating how individuals acquire a vocabulary to express their worldview and subsequently rehearse and reiterate that worldview into a perfectly rigid set of beliefs capable of blinding the individual to other views.^Chapter 5, "Responsibilities of the Social Movement Leader: Piety or Rigidity" expands the overall conclusions of this study, its contributions to social movement rhetoric, and identifies ideas for further study"--Abstract.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until July 24, 2015: Texas Christian University.en_US
dc.subject.lcsh350.org History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMcKibben, Bill.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBurke, Kenneth, 1897-1993.en_US
dc.subject.lcshClimatic changes Social aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGlobal environmental change.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmentalism.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRhetoric Political aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSocial movements.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLeadership.en_US
dc.titleA rhetorical history of 350.org's International Day of Climate Action [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitDepartment of English


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