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dc.contributor.authorVanenkevort, Erin Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-12T18:45:40Z
dc.date.available2014-08-12T18:45:40Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifierumi-10525en_US
dc.identifiercat-002173112en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/6054
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Aug. 22, 2014).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Cathy R. Cox.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractMore and more breast cancer campaigns are turning to sexualized images and slogans to gain attention and raise money. However, from the perspective of objectification theory, these campaigns can be detrimental to women's psychological and physical health to the extent that they raise concerns about the body. The purpose of the present research was to examine the effects such sexy breast cancer slogans have on feelings of objectification, body attitudes, and donation intentions. Study 1 found that women reported a heightened accessibility of body-related thoughts in the presence of someone wearing an "I Love Boobies" t-shirt compared to a neutral one. Study 2 found that women reported increased discomfort with conducting breast self-examinations following a sexualized breast cancer prime. Finally, contrary to expectations, Study 3 showed that viewing a sexy breast cancer advertisement did not impact donation intentions. The implications of this research are further discussed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.title"I love boobies" [electronic resource] : the influence of sexualized breast cancer campaigns on objectification and women's health /en_US
dc.title.alternativeInfluence of sexualized breast cancer campaigns on objectification and women's healthen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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