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dc.creatorMonnig, Oscar
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-12T18:11:20Z
dc.date.available2024-02-12T18:11:20Z
dc.date.issued1958-09-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/63183
dc.descriptionLetter to Walter from Oscar E. Monnig responding to meteorite samples sent to him and confirming they are meteorites.
dc.relationOscar Monnig Papers (MS 124)
dc.rightsPrior written permission from TCU Special Collections required to use any document or photograph.
dc.sourceSeries III, Box 06, Forestburg, Montague Co., TX folder
dc.subjectMeteorite
dc.subjectForestburg meteorite
dc.subjectForestburg (Tex.)
dc.subjectChicago Museum of Natural History
dc.subjectSaint Louis meteorite
dc.subjectSaint Louis (Mo.)
dc.titleLetter to Walter from Oscar E. Monnig, September 30, 1958
dc.typeDocument
dc.description.transcription1958, Sep. 30. Dear Walter: This acknowledges receipt with very sincere thanks of the two meteorite samples sent to me, which arrived in good condition today. I have not had time to do any work on the Belle Plaine chip, but from a simple inspection of it I would say at once it is surely a meteorite, if you had any doubts. I look forward to seeing the photo. It is very generous of Ed Friton to part with piecesof [pieces of] the St. Louisstone [Louis stone] — forgive this dern [darn] typewriter and me for not spacing. I am pleased to have this pretty littlepolished [little polished] thumbnail piece for my collection. I drove up to Forestburg, about 60 miles from here, yesterday. Lo and behold, the second meteorite reported from there was really one, almost 60 pounds, In relatively good shape, too--not too old or oxidized. You may recall I got one from there last January, in very bad shape. A few months later the lady who acted as my liason [liaison] agent In that district reported another probable one, but was irked at me for not having given the first one prompt and proper publicity. She got in touch with U. S. National and I feared they had the second stone, which Henderson identified from a chip as a black chondrite. But I find It's still there on the porch of the finder’s home, and I'm making a strong bid for it! It isa [is a] surprisingly featureless wedge-shaped sort of stone with flat sides, browned crust, and didn't hove a flaw on it until they broke a bit off one corner to send to Henderson. It is another remarkable instance of two meteorites found nearby that are probably not related. They are within less than 4 miles of each other. I shall probably have to call this Forestburg No. 2 if I get the stone and the privilege of naming it. I’m bidding $2 a pound because of the relatively nice preservation. It was in the bottom of an erosion ditch about 9 to 10 feet below the general surface of the surrounding field, but I assume this doe not represent original penetration, but simple erosional lowering. One man claims he saw it there 10 years ago, and I don't much doubt it. Fossil hunters from the Chicago Museum of Natural History have camped in the near vicinity.


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  • Records of the Monnig Meteorite Gallery [2247]
    The files are arranged alphabetically, usually according to the location of discovery of the meteorite. The files contain correspondence and research material on the meteorites in the collection.

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