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dc.creatorHenderson, Edward P. (Edward Porter), 1898-
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-12T18:11:43Z
dc.date.available2024-02-12T18:11:43Z
dc.date.issued1965-01-25
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/63205
dc.descriptionLetter to Oscar E. Monnig from E. P. Henderson, curator of the Division of Meteorites at the Smithsonian Institution United States National Museum, discussing the information and pictures recieved about the Fort Stockton, Pecos County, meteorite.
dc.relationOscar Monnig Papers (MS 124)
dc.rightsPrior written permission from TCU Special Collections required to use any document or photograph.
dc.sourceSeries III, Box 06, Fort Stockton, Pecos Co., TX folder
dc.subjectMeteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton meteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton (Tex.)
dc.subjectSmithsonian Institution
dc.subjectMetallography
dc.subjectHenderson, Edward P.
dc.titleCorrespondence from E. P. Henderson to Oscar E. Monnig, January 25, 1965
dc.typeDocument
dc.description.transcriptionSMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM WASHINGTON, D. C. 20560 January 25, 1965 Mr. Oscar E. Monnig 29 Chelsea Drive Fort Worth, Texas 76115 Dear Oscar: This will greet you on your arrival home. Hope your trip to the east was successful as well as profitable. Somehow you are expert in getting east without coming to Washington. Wish I could change that; please tell me how I should proceed. Thanks for the information about the Fort Stockton, Pecos county, iron. Those pictures look interesting. Since there is a cut on one side of the specimen, why not let us take off a thin plate parallel to it, polish the face on your specimen, and return it? You would have a better looking specimen and we would have the Fort Stockton iron in this collection. Actually, this meteorite should be described and you could do that. Think it over, my good friend. Usually, the exposed portions of the iron meteorites are less weathered than the part which is in the ground. You seem to think in this case it is just the opposite. It would be interesting to see if the "caliche" would come off without changing the texture or features of the iron crust because under the caliche there might be some nice flight surfaces. The picture showing what you call the top has trace of the octahedral pattern. This may not be etching by weathering, it could be differential hardness, the other softer material being abraded by windblown dust. This feature is well shown on the Quillaqua, Chile, meteorite and a few other irons. Thanks for the pictures of Fort Stockton; please think about getting this iron described. Kindest personal regards Cordially yours, E. P. Henderson Curator Division of Meteorites


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  • Records of the Monnig Meteorite Gallery [2247]
    The files are arranged alphabetically, usually according to the location of discovery of the meteorite. The files contain correspondence and research material on the meteorites in the collection.

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