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dc.date.accessioned2024-02-12T18:11:44Z
dc.date.available2024-02-12T18:11:44Z
dc.date.issuedn.d.
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/63207
dc.descriptionNotes on the description and location of the iron found.
dc.relationOscar Monnig Papers (MS 124)
dc.rightsPrior written permission from TCU Special Collections required to use any document or photograph.
dc.sourceSeries III, Box 06, Fort Stockton, Pecos Co., TX folder
dc.subjectMeteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton meteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton (Tex.)
dc.subjectWidmanstätten pattern
dc.titleNotes on the Fort Stockton, Texas, meteorite
dc.typeDocument
dc.description.transcriptionThe FORT STOCKTON, TEXAS, Meteorite This 10 1/2 pound iron meteorite was found about six miles WNW of Ft. Stockton, Texas, about 1952. Charles Eldred, a rancher, wanted a rock to throw at some sheep he was herding, and saw this object partly protruding from the soil. When he stopped to pick it up he found he had to dig it out, and then that it was far too heavy to throw handily. This unusual density impressed him, and he took the object home. Pieces he submitted for analysis showed the piece was mostly iron, with some nickel, which is characteristic of this type of meteorite. The iron is very interesting and unusual in its weathering. The large rounded face lay uppermost on the ground as found, and has been naturally etched by water (and carbonic acid of natural origin?) to show a criss-cross pattern characteristic of most iron meteorites. This shows the internal crystalline structure, and is called the "Widmanstatten lines". A whitish collar around the central section of the meteorite is water deposited limestone that gradually formed on the object after rains as it lay in the ground. As the average annual rainfall in this region is perhaps 10 inches, this may have taken manyyears [many years]. The bottom portions of the meteorite are beautifully preserved and show the last flowing threads of melted iron that solidified on the object as it fell. These are rare on an iron meteorite. It appears to have changed its direction of flight several times as it tumbled to earth, and actually the broad convex face that finally lay uppermost was probably the last pointed downwards during the melting stage of flight. This 10 1/2 pound iron meteorite was found about 6 miles WNW of Ft. Stockton, Texas, about 1952. Charles Eldred, a rancher, wanted a rock to throw at some sheep he was herding, and saw this object partly protruding from the soil


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  • Records of the Monnig Meteorite Gallery [2247]
    The files are arranged alphabetically, usually according to the location of discovery of the meteorite. The files contain correspondence and research material on the meteorites in the collection.

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