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dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Braeen_US
dc.creatorBray, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-29T15:39:40Z
dc.date.available2024-04-29T15:39:40Z
dc.date.issued2024-04-25
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/64185
dc.description.abstractEducation requirements for police officers have increased since the 1920s and will likely continue to increase amidst calls for criminal justice reform. The effects of higher education are well documented, and findings suggest it reduces use of force, involvement in traffic related accidents, use of sick time, and even racial prejudice. This study aimed to add to the body of research in a different regard, by examining the effect education has on officers’ job satisfaction. Education showed to be significant at the bivariate level with both current job satisfaction and the change in job satisfaction. At the bivariate level, education was statistically significant with respect to current job satisfaction and change in job satisfaction. At the multivariate level, education no longer exerted a significant effect on job satisfaction. Rank and experience were found to be statistically significant. Recommendations for policy implications and directions for future research are also discussed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCriminologyen_US
dc.subjectJob satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectPolice officersen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between education and job satisfaction among police officersen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Scienceen_US
local.collegeAddran College of Liberal Artsen_US
local.departmentCriminology & Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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