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dc.contributor.advisorBalizet, Ariane Men_US
dc.creatorLitchfield, Claire Leeann
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-30T13:06:11Z
dc.date.available2024-04-30T13:06:11Z
dc.date.issued2024-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/64206
dc.description.abstractThis thesis traces how feminine virtue appears on the skin of early modern characters, especially in ways legible to other characters around them. In four tragedies— Shakespeare’s Othello and Hamlet, John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore, and the anonymous A Warning for Fair Women— I discuss how men use the fantasy of legible skin as justification for violence against women. I establish the early modern conflation between whiteness and moral purity, then investigate how medical history, criminal justice practices, and cultural racial anxiety from the period make marked skin emblematic of besmirched virtue.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEnglish literatureen_US
dc.subjectLiteratureen_US
dc.subjectEarly modern dramaen_US
dc.subjectJohn Forden_US
dc.subjectQueen Elizabeth Ien_US
dc.subjectShakespeareen_US
dc.titleSpotting virtue: the legibility of skin in early modern dramaen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Artsen_US
local.collegeAddran College of Liberal Artsen_US
local.departmentEnglishen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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