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dc.contributor.advisorLund, Emilyen_US
dc.creatorMattingly, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-09T12:46:23Z
dc.date.available2024-05-09T12:46:23Z
dc.date.issued2024-05-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/64305
dc.description.abstractThis three-manuscript dissertation evaluates how the domains of language, executive functioning and physical activity interact for children with communication disorders, and how those domains may differentially influence development across different etiologies. The first study explores the relationship between executive functioning and language in children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Parent reports of inattention and hyperactivity are related to child language knowledge and fatigue. The second study evaluates the impact of introducing movement to word learning instruction for children with Down syndrome. More words were learned in the movement condition than in a business-as-usual teaching condition. The third study combines all three domains across etiologies of hearing loss, Down syndrome, and typical development. Results indicate that etiology does impact outcomes in these domains. Executive functioning predicts language outcomes for all children, and etiology impacts this relationship. Further, physical activity interacts with executive functioning skills to strengthen language. The findings of this dissertation have implications for differentiated language interventions according to disability and incorporation of multiple domains.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSpeech therapyen_US
dc.subjectDisability studiesen_US
dc.subjectDown syndromeen_US
dc.subjectLanguage disordersen_US
dc.subjectDeaf and hard of hearingen_US
dc.titleThe interaction of language, executive functioning and structured physical activity for children at risk for secondary communication disordersen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelPh.D. in Health Sciencesen_US
local.collegeHarris College of Nursing and Health Sciencesen_US
local.departmentCommunication Sciences and Disordersen_US
dc.type.genreDissertationen_US


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