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dc.contributor.authorFogelberg, Katherineen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T21:47:38Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T21:47:38Z
dc.date.created2014.en_US
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/7163
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Jan. 8, 2015).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Education; advisor, Molly Weinburgh.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractBecause professional development (PD) is about persuasion and influence, it makes sense to use an influence framework when trying to determine the reasons current university-level PD has been fairly ineffective in changing teacher practice to date. This research used the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to determine if university natural science professors' attitudes and beliefs toward the discipline of education (DE), a construct not recognized in the current literature, were positive or negative. The study also looked to discover some of the major influences on the participants' attitudes and beliefs toward DE. A method bricolage was used to analyze data from 10 participants in two separate phases in an attempt to establish a replicable Discourse Analysis methodology for analyzing attitudes and beliefs, and to investigate the major influences on the formation of these attitudes and beliefs. The findings indicate that in general the participants' had positive beliefs in and about DE with negative attitudes toward DE and that the majority of the participants' views of teaching were formed by a number of significant influences. However, the participants' attitudes and beliefs toward DE are complicated by several issues, the most prominent being that this cohort's ideas about DE are based upon their PD experiences, which were generally delivered by centers for teaching excellence (CTEs) or equivalent entities. This research needs to be extended to determine the generalizability of these findings, as well as to provide evidence-based research to support the re-thinking of how PD is delivered at the university level.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCollege teachers Attitudes.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCareer development.en_US
dc.subject.lcshScience teachers Attitudes.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBelief and doubt.en_US
dc.subject.lcshScience Study and teaching (Higher) United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshScience teachers United States.en_US
dc.titleAttitudes and beliefs of university science professors toward the discipline of education [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.title.alternativeAttitudes and beliefs of science professorsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitCollege of Education
local.subjectareaEducation


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