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dc.contributor.authorHenry, Deborah Marieen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T21:47:39Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T21:47:39Z
dc.date.created2014.en_US
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/7164
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Jan. 8, 2015).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Education; advisor, Molly Weinburgh.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractChemistry is a bridge that connects a number of scientific disciplines. High school students should be able to determine whether scientific information is accurate, how chemistry applies to daily life, and the mechanism by which systems operate (NRC, 2012). This research focuses on describing hypothetical learning progressions for student understanding of the chemical reactions of nitrogen and nuclear processes and examines whether there is consistency in scientific reasoning between these two distinct conceptual areas. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the written products of students including homework, formative and summative tests, laboratory notebooks, reflective journals, written presentations, and discussion board contributions via Edmodo (an online program). The ten participants were 15 and 16 year old students enrolled in a general high school chemistry course. Instruction took place over a ten week period. The learning progression levels ranged from 0 to 4 and were described as missing, novice, intermediate, proficient, and expert. The results were compared to the standards set by the NRC with a lower anchor (expectations for grade 8) and upper anchor (expectations for grade 12). The results indicate that, on average, students were able to reach an intermediate level of understanding for these concepts.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChemistry Study and teaching (Secondary) United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshScience Study and teaching (Secondary) United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLearning.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNitrogen.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNuclear reactions.en_US
dc.titleExploring hypothetical learning progressions for the chemistry of nitrogen and nuclear processes [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitCollege of Education
local.subjectareaEducation


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