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dc.contributor.authorYarnell, Tyler
dc.date2014-05-02
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-07T18:42:51Z
dc.date.available2015-01-07T18:42:51Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier282en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/7355
dc.description.abstractReligion plays a distinct role in microfinance. This paper seeks to identify, through an inductive case study of two microfinance institutions (MFIs), the impacts of religion on development through a religious financial analysis. The study concludes there are positives and negatives, and the differences can be powerful. The differences are powered by a set of shared values and core principles that religion promotes, making the religion-microfinance nexus distinct and unique; the two weigh heavily upon each other. Religion brings an emphasis on universally applicable values and development is a vehicle for value fulfillment. In the microcosm of the study, religion promotes lowered borrowing costs, connects the organization to the community on a deeper level than in its absence, and encourages microcredit+ services that work to alleviate needs that are non-economic. However, there are lowered rates of return and portfolio yields because lower interest rates are charged and financial profitability is often held in question.
dc.titleFaith In Lending: The Effects Of Religion On Microfinance
etd.degree.departmentFinance
local.collegeNeeley School of Business
local.collegeJohn V. Roach Honors College
local.departmentFinance


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