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dc.contributor.advisorWoodworth, Steven E.
dc.contributor.authorDossman, Steven Nathanielen_US
dc.coverage.spatialVicksburg (Miss.)en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialConfederate States of Americaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:29Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:29Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifieretd-05042012-145139en_US
dc.identifierumi-10314en_US
dc.identifiercat-001821254en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4390
dc.description.abstractThe Vicksburg campaign marked a key transitional phase of Union policy toward white Southern civilians. Initially, Northern military commanders instituted a conciliatorily approach to Southern civilians and property, but by late 1862 this policy had evolved to a pragmatic form of warfare that allowed stricter measures but still attempted to limit the physical and monetary damage inflicted upon civilians. In the Mississippi River Valley in early 1863, Major General Ulysses S. Grant's Army of the Tennessee perfected a punitive policy concerning civilians known to historians as "hard war," which authorized the destruction of all Confederate economic and transportation resources. This dissertation examines the creation of hard war policy by the lower ranks of the Union army and concludes that the Army of the Tennessee developed hard war before other Union armies due to to its deeper penetration of the Lower South. The campaign against Vicksburg transformed the way in which the war impacted the civilian population of the South. The drastic amount of damage inflicted upon the population and infrastructure by Grant's decision to forage intensely and deprive opposing armies of sustenance effectively removed this area from the conflict and created the means that would enable the Union to win the war in the next two years. The Vicksburg campaign cemented the transition from pragmatic to hard war in the western theater, from which it would later spread throughout the Confederacy in 1864.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGrant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885 Military leadership.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States. Army of the Tennessee.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrategy.en_US
dc.subject.lcshVicksburg (Miss.) History Siege, 1863.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Social aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshConfederate States of America History.en_US
dc.titleLong march to Vicksburg: soldier and civilian interaction in the Vicksburg campaignen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of History
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeAddRan College of Liberal Arts
local.departmentHistory
local.academicunitDepartment of History
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaHistory
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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