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dc.contributor.advisorHogg, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorSowa, Angela Renaeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T14:50:42Z
dc.date.available2014-07-23T14:50:42Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifieretd-05132014-122158en_US
dc.identifierumi-10499en_US
dc.identifiercat-002154433en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/4552
dc.description.abstractConservative women bloggers constitute a growing force, both economically and ideologically, in the United States. However, despite their influence, they are seldom subjects of academic research, and their public writings remain largely unexamined, particularly in the field of rhetoric. Because of their cultural importance and their academic underrepresentation, conservative women bloggers are an ideal demographic for study. This project seeks to explore the intersections between these women's online writing and rhetorical genre theory, a lens that enables us to see the complex systemic and individual rhetorical choices these women make. Based in qualitative data drawn from 78 homemaking blogs, this study works to deepen understanding of how one particular virtual community works to uphold, reinforce, and police ideology through genre. Drawing on work from Amy Devitt, Anis Bawarshi, Anne Freadman, Michael Warner, and Dale Sullivan, among others, this project examines how, through homemaking blogs, conservative Christian women construct a virtual community, reinforce common ideologies, and police the boundaries of their community. The rhetorical choices these authors make, and the ways in which the blogs' readers reinforce or challenge such choices, create discursive spaces from which complex rhetorical and generic acts emerge. The study of such spaces enriches our understanding of women's literate lives, as well as adding to and complicating our understanding of how genres function in new media.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen conservatives United States Blogs.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChristian women United States Blogs.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHomemakers Blogs.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBlogs United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRhetoric.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLiterary form.en_US
dc.subject.lcshInternet Social aspects.en_US
dc.titleHome is where the maker is: rhetorical genre in the homemaking blogen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of English
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeAddRan College of Liberal Arts
local.departmentEnglish
local.academicunitDepartment of English
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaEnglish
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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