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dc.contributor.advisorJessica L. Fripp
dc.creatorNguyen, Kim Phan
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T16:32:56Z
dc.date.available2021-08-09T16:32:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-04
dc.date.submitted
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/48004
dc.description.abstractDefined as the participation in an activity for pleasure or recreation, play can serve a greater purpose especially in art forms that express more intangible concepts. I propose the idea of play as a relational tool for the investigation and understanding of interactive artwork. Playfulness characterizes the digital installations of the Tokyo-based art collective teamLab (est. 2001). Melding premodern Japanese pictorial traditions with current digital processes, teamLab’s installations function like playgrounds. Anyone who plays can interact with game-like elements in artificial environments. Visitors wander inside artworks that are projection-mapped into gallery spaces outfitted with sensors that are triggered by touch or motion. The collective encourages people to play since this act is crucial to processing their works. Each artwork has the objective of being social environments where the presence of others is a positive experience rather than a hindrance. Inside these digital playgrounds, opportunities arise for transcendence, joy, and connection.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectArt history [0377] - primaryen_US
dc.subjectAesthetics [0650]en_US
dc.subjectWeb studies [0646]en_US
dc.subjectart collectiveen_US
dc.subjectart installationen_US
dc.subjectdigital arten_US
dc.subjectJapanese contemporary arten_US
dc.subjectplay in arten_US
dc.subjectteamLaben_US
dc.titleteamLab: Digital Playgroundsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Arts
local.academicunitCollege of Fine Arts
local.academicunitSchool of Art


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