Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDiel, Lorien_US
dc.creatorBoutelle, Hailey
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-02T22:11:13Z
dc.date.available2022-05-02T22:11:13Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-02
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/52825
dc.description.abstractFrom 2000-2010, three socially-engaged women photographers spent time documenting lower-class residents of the United States in Appalachia, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania, respectively. These series are reflexive of their historical moment in which locals grapple with the consequences of industry-occupation by the coal, steel, and oil and gas industries. For survival and cultural persistence, most residents face their living conditions with the collective strength of transgenerational fortitude. Each of the projects addresses issues of class, gender, and race, though their experiences differ depending upon their geographic positioning and distinct cultural makeup. In this thesis, I use their projects as case studies for my argument that critical regionalism, a methodology previously used by Douglas Powell in his study of contemporary American culture, is an incredibly useful methodology to implement in contemporary art history studies, as it reconciles the geographic uniqueness of a local culture with broader, more global forces and patterns of history. I demonstrate the efficacy of critical regionalism’s art historical application using Hannah Modigh’s Hillbilly Heroin, Honey, Kael Alford’s Bottom of da Boot, and LaToya Ruby Frazier’s The Notion of Family, ultimately finding that this perspective most effectively addresses the issues of deindustrialization and late stage capitalism in American society.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectArt history [0377] - primaryen_US
dc.subjectAmerican history [0337]en_US
dc.subjectArt criticism [0365]en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Arten_US
dc.subjectArt Historyen_US
dc.subjectCritical Regionalismen_US
dc.subjectKael Alforden_US
dc.subjectLaToya Ruby Frazieren_US
dc.subjectPhotographyen_US
dc.titleCritical regionalism and the politics of socially engaged documentary photography in the United States, 2000-2010en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.collegeCollege of Fine Artsen_US
local.departmentArt
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Arts


Files in this item

Thumbnail
This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record